Programing Strength Training For Children

This month's article is lengthy as it give details on programming strength training for children. The recomended process keeps in mind the long term development methods for athletes as outlined by Bayli (1999). Despite these detailed recommendations they are no substitute for a properly qualified strength and conditioning coach.


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Strength Training and Children: Intensity, how heavy is too heavy?

In this section will attempt to address some of the areas of most controversy pertaining to children and weight training; how heavy is too heavy? What is an appropriate training load? What types of exercises and loadings are appropriate at various stages of childhood?


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Note on Children and Strength Training

A side note as we continue to review strength training in children, youth and adolescents.


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Australian Strength & Conditioning Association's Position Stand: Resistance Training for Children and Adolescents

Australian Sports Conditioning (ASC) often recommends that children in competitive sport perform resistance training, however this is often met with skepticism by parents and coaches who believe that children and adolescents should not strength train. This notion is unfounded and the peer reviewed research suggests that there is no lower age limit for children to strength train. The Australian Strength & Conditioning Association has released a position stand on this subject. It is lengthy and makes specific recomendations. ASC will be sumarising this position stand over the coming months. Should you wish to view the entire article now please follow this link: ASCA Position Stand: Resistance Training for Children and Adolescents


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Warming Up, More than going through the Motions

The warm up is the most fundamental part of all workouts. It is performed by all exercises from those simply taking general exercise for its health benefits to those preparing for elite competition. The approach to warm ups however has changed over the last five years or so. Richard Scrivener outlines the basics of the warm up and how to adjust the warm up for your athlete or client.


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Triple Extension: The Key to Athletic Power

There are many factors that contribute to athletic success; balance, core strength, spatial awareness, strength, tactical knowledge and of course hard work. However these things are useless without power, the ability to move quickly, apply maximum locomotive force in the shortest amount of time (the force impulse). In this article we will look at the secrets to training and improving impulse through triple extension. In most sports applications, where all other things are equal the athlete able to exert the most power will win the contest.


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Can We Reduce Fitness Training Load by 90%?

If the amount of time spent on fitness training could be reduced by 90% most coaches would be interested. The result would be more rested athletes that have more time to develop their skills and strategy and athletes who would rather spend time on their sport instead of slogging it out in preseason would certainly be in support. While more work is required to ensure that this is viable option there has been some evidence published in the last few years that suggests that this might be possible.


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Lower Limb Injury Prevention in Football

The method of warm up has changed dramatically over the past decade at the top level of sport. Long gone are the days of jogging around the pitch and doing a few static stretches. Modern warm ups involve dynamic movements, ball handling skills and active stretching movements that rehearse the competitive or training activity to come.


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Hamstring Injuries in Football

Hamstring injuries are highly prevalent in football accounting for 42% of all strain related injuries and in professional leagues in England strain injuries account for over 80% of injuries to the thigh. 47% of these injuries occurred in the final 15 minutes of the match. This shows that any strength and conditioning coach involved in football needs to be focused on hamstring injury prevention given the prevalence of the injury and the prognosis for recovery [up to 50 weeks post injury (Askling, et al, 2005)].


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Speed Agility and Quickness Training

Most sports require Speed, Agility and Quickness or SAQ for short. This area of performance requires players to move their feet quickly, with power to evade or intercept the opposition. This month we review the crucial aspects of speed, quickness and agility in time for the commencement of the football and rugby seasons. These ideas are taken from Vern Gambetta one of the world’s leaders in speed and agility training.


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